Human Shape Estimation using Statistical Body Models

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Dateien:
Aufrufstatistik

URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10900/76439
http://nbn-resolving.de/urn:nbn:de:bsz:21-dspace-764394
http://dx.doi.org/10.15496/publikation-17841
Dokumentart: Dissertation
Date: 2017-05
Language: English
Faculty: 7 Mathematisch-Naturwissenschaftliche Fakultät
Department: Informatik
Advisor: Lensch, Hendrik (Prof. Dr.)
Day of Oral Examination: 2017-03-02
DDC Classifikation: 004 - Data processing and computer science
Keywords: Maschinelles Sehen
Other Keywords:
Body Estimation
Computer Vision
License: Publishing license including print on demand
Order a printed copy: Print-on-Demand
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Abstract:

Human body estimation methods transform real-world observations into predictions about human body state. These estimation methods benefit a variety of health, entertainment, clothing, and ergonomics applications. State may include pose, overall body shape, and appearance. Body state estimation is underconstrained by observations; ambiguity presents itself both in the form of missing data within observations, and also in the form of unknown correspondences between observations. We address this challenge with the use of a statistical body model: a data-driven virtual human. This helps resolve ambiguity in two ways. First, it fills in missing data, meaning that incomplete observations still result in complete shape estimates. Second, the model provides a statistically-motivated penalty for unlikely states, which enables more plausible body shape estimates. Body state inference requires more than a body model; we therefore build obser- vation models whose output is compared with real observations. In this thesis, body state is estimated from three types of observations: 3D motion capture markers, depth and color images, and high-resolution 3D scans. In each case, a forward process is proposed which simulates observations. By comparing observations to the results of the forward process, state can be adjusted to minimize the difference between simulated and observed data. We use gradient-based methods because they are critical to the precise estimation of state with a large number of parameters. The contributions of this work include three parts. First, we propose a method for the estimation of body shape, nonrigid deformation, and pose from 3D markers. Second, we present a concise approach to differentiating through the rendering process, with application to body shape estimation. And finally, we present a statistical body model trained from human body scans, with state-of-the-art fidelity, good runtime performance, and compatibility with existing animation packages.

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