Metabolic Brain-Computer Interfaces

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dc.contributor.advisor Birbaumer, Niels (Prof. Dr.) de_DE
dc.contributor.author Sitaram, Ranganatha de_DE
dc.date.accessioned 2010-07-23 de_DE
dc.date.accessioned 2014-03-18T09:43:13Z
dc.date.available 2010-07-23 de_DE
dc.date.available 2014-03-18T09:43:13Z
dc.date.issued 2010 de_DE
dc.identifier.other 326627197 de_DE
dc.identifier.uri http://nbn-resolving.de/urn:nbn:de:bsz:21-opus-50257 de_DE
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10900/45697
dc.description.abstract Brain-Computer Interfaces (BCI) utilise neurophysiological signals originating in the brain to activate or deactivate external devices or computers (Donoghue 2002; Wolpaw, Birbaumer et al. 2002; Nicolelis 2003; Birbaumer and Cohen 2007). The neuronal signals can be recorded from inside the brain (invasive BCIs) or outside (non-invasive BCIs) of the brain. Most BCIs developed so far have used operant training of direct neuroelectric responses, Electroencephalography (EEG) waves, event-related potentials and brain oscillations (Birbaumer, Weber et al. 2006; Birbaumer and Cohen 2007). Compared to neuroelectric studies on regulation of brain activity, there have been fewer studies with metabolic signals from the brain (Sitaram, Caria et al. 2007; Weiskopf, Sitaram et al. 2007; Sitaram, Weiskopf et al. 2008). Near Infrared Spectroscopy (NIRS) and Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) present themselves as attractive methods of acquiring hemodynamic activity of the brain for a developing a BCI. In this study, we exploit NIRS and fMRI for the implementation of BCIs for the investigation of regulation of hemodynamic signals in the brain and their behavioural consequences. We propose that these methods could be used not only for communication and control in paralysis, but also as powerful tools for experiments in neuroscience and rehabilitation and treatment of neurological disorders. en
dc.description.abstract The neuronal signals can be recorded from inside the brain (invasive BCIs) or outside (non-invasive BCIs) of the brain. Most BCIs developed so far have used operant training of direct neuroelectric responses, Electroencephalography (EEG) waves, event-related potentials and brain oscillations (Birbaumer, Weber et al. 2006; Birbaumer and Cohen 2007). Compared to neuroelectric studies on regulation of brain activity, there have been fewer studies with metabolic signals from the brain (Sitaram, Caria et al. 2007; Weiskopf, Sitaram et al. 2007; Sitaram, Weiskopf et al. 2008). Near Infrared Spectroscopy (NIRS) and Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) present themselves as attractive methods of acquiring hemodynamic activity of the brain for a developing a BCI. In this study, we exploit NIRS and fMRI for the implementation of BCIs for the investigation of regulation of hemodynamic signals in the brain and their behavioural consequences. We propose that these methods could be used not only for communication and control in paralysis, but also as powerful tools for experiments in neuroscience and rehabilitation and treatment of neurological disorders. en
dc.language.iso en de_DE
dc.publisher Universität Tübingen de_DE
dc.rights ubt-podok de_DE
dc.rights.uri http://tobias-lib.uni-tuebingen.de/doku/lic_mit_pod.php?la=de de_DE
dc.rights.uri http://tobias-lib.uni-tuebingen.de/doku/lic_mit_pod.php?la=en en
dc.subject.classification Gehirn-Computer-Schnittstelle , NMR-Tomographie , Selbstregulation , Neurofeedback , Infrarotspektroskopie de_DE
dc.subject.ddc 610 de_DE
dc.subject.other Brain-Computer Interface , Near infrared spectroscopy , BCI , NIRS , Functional magnetic resonance imaging , fMRI en
dc.title Metabolic Brain-Computer Interfaces en
dc.title Metabolische Gehirn-Komputer Schnittstelle de_DE
dc.type PhDThesis de_DE
dcterms.dateAccepted 2010-06-30 de_DE
utue.publikation.fachbereich Sonstige de_DE
utue.publikation.fakultaet 4 Medizinische Fakultät de_DE
dcterms.DCMIType Text de_DE
utue.publikation.typ doctoralThesis de_DE
utue.opus.id 5025 de_DE
thesis.grantor 05/06 Medizinische Fakultät de_DE

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