Development of Epicardial Devices for the Support of Cardiac Function in Patients with Myocardial Infarction and Heart Failure

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URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10900/104366
http://nbn-resolving.de/urn:nbn:de:bsz:21-dspace-1043666
http://dx.doi.org/10.15496/publikation-45744
Dokumentart: Dissertation
Date: 2022-06-17
Language: English
Faculty: 7 Mathematisch-Naturwissenschaftliche Fakultät
Department: Biologie
Advisor: Schenke-Layland, Katja (Prof. Dr.)
Day of Oral Examination: 2020-06-17
DDC Classifikation: 500 - Natural sciences and mathematics
570 - Life sciences; biology
610 - Medicine and health
Keywords: Herzinfarkt , Herzinsuffizienz
Other Keywords:
Ventricular stabilization
Epicardial carrier device
Extravascular device
Hyaluronic acid hydrogel
Stem cell delivery
Myocardial infarction
Active mechanical support
Heart failure
License: Publishing license including print on demand
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Inhaltszusammenfassung:

Dissertation ist gesperrt bis 17. Juni 2022 !

Abstract:

The administration of biomaterial-based therapies to the infarcted ventricle wall by currently available approaches is often associated with several issues impairing the final performance of the applied therapeutic agents. As the epicardium has been identified as region with vast regenerative potential, it is supposed to represent a reasonable target for the support of the weakened myocardium after a myocardial infarct. However, targeted local delivery of biomaterial-based therapies to the dynamic epicardial heart surface in a non-surgical procedure represents a remarkable challenge due to limitations imposed by the biomaterials and regenerative agents, especially in case of stem cell technologies. Hence, this PhD thesis aims to address current limitations for the delivery of biomaterials to well-defined regions on the epicardium by developing novel advanced application strategies for biomaterial-based therapies to the epicardial heart surface. These novel delivery devices intend to provide the opportunity to better exploit the potential of applied therapeutic agents and reduce application associated deleterious effects.

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